UKJ10118880120001 BANAN. Bilde fra digitalt museum.

 

1888 DS BANAN (UKJ101188801)

 

 

“Mosquito”

 

 

 

Type

Dampskip, stykkgods, frukt steam ship, general cargo, fruit carrier

Off.no (IMO):

5614248

Flagg (flag):

NOR

Havn(port):

Kristiania

Byggeår (year built):

1888/12

Bnr (Sno):

182

Bygger (yard):

W. Doxford & Sons, Pallion, Sunderland, England.

Eier (owner):

Det Søndenfjelds-Norske D/S, Kristiania.

Disponent (manager):

Det Søndenfjelds-Norske D/S, Kristiania.

Klasse (Class).:

DnV +1A1

 

 

Tonnasje (Tonnage):

1.240 tdw, 979 brt-574 nrt.

Dimensjoner (size):

Loa: 215,5’–B: 30,5’-D: 15,7’.

Lasthåndtering
(cargo handling.)

Naturlig ventilasjon.

Kjølemaskineri
Refr. machinery:

 

 

 

Navigasjonsutstyr:

 

Manøversystemer
(syst.for manouvering)

 

Dekksmaskineri
(deck machinery):

 

Kommunikasjon (comm.):

 

Kallesignal (Call sign.):

HFRG

 

 

Fremdrift (propulsion):

1 stempel dampmaskin (steam reciprocating), triple exp. 3-sylinder, syl. diam.: 16,5"-27,5"-44,0”, slag/stroke: 30,0”. 120 NHK (675 IHK). Bygget av W. Doxford & Sons, Pallion, Sunderland, England.

Fart/forbr. (speed/cons.):

10,0 knop

Hjelpemaskineri (aux):

 

Tot. el. kraft (el. power):

 

Kjele(r) (boiler):

1 dampkjele (boiler), med dim.: 13,8’ x 10,5’ og 3 fyrganger. Arbeidstrykk 150 psi. Bygget av William Doxford & Sons, Pallion, Sunderland, England.

 

 

Bemanning (crew):

pers,

 

 

Historikk:

1888 Bygget som BANAN av William Doxford & Sons, Pallion Yard, Sunderland, England for Søndenfjelds-Norske Dampskibsselskab, Kristiania. Sjøsatt 04/12, ferdigstilt i desember. På charter til United Fruit Co.
1890 Solgt til A/S Banan (Thorvald Dannevig), Kristiania.
1910 Solgt 11/05 til Hvalfangerselskapet Nimrod A/S (Chr. Nielsen & Co.), Larvik. Brukt som kokeri og fraktebåt for selskapet ved fangst på Svalbard.
1912 Grunnstøtte 19/01 ved Whitby, England. Ankom  Hartlepool, England som nødhavn. Kapteinen bøtelagt med NOK 250 for uaktsom navigering. Havariet kom på NOK 36.000.
Solgt 11/11 til Dampskibsrederiet A/S Solli (Thyro Sørensen & B. Lie), Kristiania. Omdøpt til SOLLI.
1913 Lie & Røer, Kristiania ble managers 15/08.
1914 Solgt 27/10 til Dampskibsrederiet A/S Baltic (E. H. Rustad), Kristiania. Omdøpt til MUNK.
1916 Solgt 31/05 til A/S Chr. Christoffersen & Co., Brevik.
Videresolgt 22/09 til Dampskibsrederiet A/S Fjeldli (Ellingsen & Johannessen), Bergen.
1917 Omdøpt til FJELDLI 10/03.
Stanset og skutt i senk 14/04 av den tyske ubåten U 30 (Kapitänleutnant Franz Grünert) mens hun varpå reise fra Härnösand, Sverige via Bergen til London, England med sement og tønnestaver. Alle ombord berget av en britisk jager som satte de i land i Lerwick, Shetland.

 


Fra sjøforklaringen i 1912
:
D/s. „Banan“ (H.F.R.G.) av Larvik, reise Burntisland til Dieppe med kul, grundstøtte den 19. januar ved Whitby, England, og fik saa stor skade, at det maatte søke nødhavn i Hartlepool. Havariet beløp sig til kr. 36 000.
        Sjøforklaring ved vicekonsulatet i Hartlepool 6/2 1912. Paa skibsinspektørens foranledning blev forhør optat ved Larviks for- hørsret den 9. mai næstefter.
Kapteinen blev av vedkommende politimyndighet for ved utvist uagtsomhet at ha medvirket til grundstøtningen forelagt en bot av 250 kr., som han vedtok.

 


Fra Sjøforklaringen i 1917:
On the seventeenth day of April, Nineteen hundred and seventeen, between the hours of four and six afternoon, the Norwegian subject Sverre Jakobsen, Master of the Steamship FJELDLI of Bergen, of 574 tons or thereby, Nett Register, distinguishing letters H.E.R.G. Presented himself at the Norwegian Consulate, Lerwick, and declared that the said ship left Bergen on the thirteenth instant, at 3 o'clock p. m., with a cargo of Cement and staves, bound for London; that the said ship, on leaving the said port of Bergen, was in perfect seaworthy condition, properly equipped, not overloaded, with cargo properly stowed, properly manned with a full crew, consisting of fourteen men and a stewardess, and fit for the voyage in every way; that all went well; that on leaving Bergen deponent had a pilot on board, whom he left at 6 o'clock p. m. same day at the house at Marstenen fyr, that deponent proceeded outwards with course West till the lighthouse was bearing S. ½ E 1 1/4 miles the Log showed 0.; that from 6.15. p. m. same day deponent steered N. V, W. until 8.30. p. m. Log showed 15.; that the ship’s course was then altered to W. ’A N. all after the compass; that on the first watch a distance of 30 miles was run; that the sea was smooth and the air was changed, and the log 45; that the lifeboats were swung out ready for use and the watch below were fully dressed, and a look out kept all the time with binoculars; that the middle watch passed without anything worthy of remark the distance run being 37 miles; that the course was still W. 1/2 N., that the air was changed with snow squalls and the log showed 82, that all went well until about 5. o’clock a. m. on the fourteenth instant; when the ship was about 76 miles W. by N. from Norwegian Coast, about half a mile off the Port beam deponent observed a submarine; that the wheel was immediately put hard to Port, and all the men were called out and supplied with lifebelts, which Were put on; that all the men were strictly on the lookout on the bridge and orders were given to increase the ship’s speed to full and have all in readyness for eventualities that the engineer was standing by the quick safety valve; that deponent, continued his course; That the lifeboats were lowered down to the rails and kept dear; that fifteen minutes later deponent observed a sub­marine appearing suddenly on the surface, and he understood that she fired a torpedo against his ship; that he ordered the wheel to be put hard over to Port, and the ship's course altered to N. to avoid the torpedo; which manoeuvre was made so quickly that the torpedo passed about five yards from Port side at a speed of about a mile per minute; that the ship's course was continued at N. for a quarter of an hour, and then changed to V. 1/2 N., that about 6 o'clock a m. to 6.30. a. in. the submarine was seen on the Port side a point abeam, five miles off and suddenly opened gun fire on deponent’s ship; that deponent observed that the submarine had not the range, and the ship’s course was again altered to N., and proceeded onwards, the submarine being then right aft; that at 7 o'clock a. m. the submarine was gaining on us to get abeam; that the FJELDLI’s engines were then stopped and the crew got into the lifeboats, which were lowered into the water; that at that time a shot, went through the galley and another hit the poop; that the boats got safely away and the submarine continued gun tire against the ship for about ten minutes and then dived; that half and hour later the submarine came to the surface again and opened fire on another Norwegian steamer, the S/S RONDANE of Christiania, which had come after deponent's ship but had altered her course to N. when the submarine opened fire on the FJELDLI that the crew of the RONDANE then took to their boats, after which all was quiet for a while; that a 8 o’clock a. in. the periscope of the submarine was observed coming from West against deponent's lifeboats, the crews of which had trouble in avoiding it; that the submarine then appeared at the surface and the Commander told deponent’s crew to come alongside and four of them were ordered on board the submarine, deponent being one of the number; that the Commander and three of the submarine's crew came onboard deponent's lifeboat with a sack containing bombs apparently with the object of destroying the FJELDLI, but after a quarter of an hour they came back without having attained their object, and deponent’s men were ordered back to their boat; that the Commander of the submarine ordered deponent to steer for the Norwegian coast, that the submarine went round the FJELDLI and fired six shots on each side, causing her to heel over with the rails in the water, to Port; that the submarine then went to the Port lifeboat and towed her down to the RONDANE that at 9. a. m. deponent saw the smoke of a British destroyer, steering in different directions, and going at a great speed, that the said destroyer at last bore down on deponent’s boats and took the crews on board, where the men were welcomed and were treated with every kindess; that the Commander of the submarine evidently saw the destroyer, as he made for the submarine with utmost speed, one of bis crew getting himself injured in jumping on board the submarine, on reaching which he was pulled like a sack down the conning tower; that all this time the deponent’s steward and the stewardess (his wife) had been kept standing on the deck of the submarine, which had to dive suddenly on the appearance on the destroyer; that in consequence of the submarine diving suddenly the steward and his wife were almost drawn down by the suction, and had to swim for the lifeboat, into which they were taken; that the deponent informed the Commander of the destroyer that that boat belonged to his ship, and that it was very urgent that the crew thereof should be taken onboard at once as they were insufficiently clad, especially the steward and his wife, both of whom had been immersed in the water, that the said boat's crew were taken on board the destroyer forthwith, and were shown every care and attention; that deponent and his crew arrived at Lerwick about 7 o'clock a. m. on Sunday, fifteenth instant; that the destruction of deponent’s ship and cargo, and sinking thereof, and whatever injury, loss or damage the owners and crew of the said ship, or any person having an interest in the ship, her cargo, or her voyage, may have sustained or might sustain, through the foresaid destruction and sinking of the ship and cargo, are in no way due to the deponent, his mate, or to any of his crew, and therefore the deponent protests for behalf of all concerned against the action of the Commander of the aforesaid submarine, in illegally attacking his ship, and in sinking her, and against all loss and damages to the said ship, her cargo, and crew, or to any person having an interest therein, caused as aforesaid, and all expenses thereby incurred in common form.

(Signed) Sverre Jacobsen,
Master of the S/S Fjeldli.

 

 

History in English:

1888 Built as BANAN at William Doxford & Sons, Pallion Yard, Sunderland, England for Søndenfjelds-Norske Dampskibsselskab, Christiania. Launched 04/12, completed in December. On charter to United Fruit Co.
1890 Sold to A/S Banan (Thorvald Dannevig), Kristiania.
1910 Sold 11/05 to Hvalfangerselskapet Nimrod A/S (Chr. Nielsen & Co.), Larvik. Used as a factory- and transport vessel in whaling around Svalbard.
1912 Stranded 19/01 at Whitby, England. Arrived port of refuge in Hartlepool, England. The master fined with NOK 250 for careless navigation.
Sold 11/11 to
Dampskibsrederiet A/S Solli (Thyro Sørensen & B. Lie), Kristiania. Renamed SOLLI.
1913 Lie & Røer, Kristiania became managers 15/08.
1914 Sold 27/10 to
Dampskibsrederiet A/S Baltic (E. H. Rustad), Kristiania. Renamed MUNK.
1916 Sold 31/05 to A/S Chr. Christoffersen & Co., Brevik.
Re-sold 22/09 to Dampskibsrederiet A/S Fjeldli (Ellingsen & Johannessen), Bergen.
1917 Renamed FJELDLI 10/03.
Captured shelled and sunk 14/04 by the German submarine U 30 (Kapitänleutnant Franz Grünert) about 76 nm North West of Marsteinen whilst on a voyage from Härnösand, Sweden via Bergen to London, England with cement and barrel staves. All crew saved by a British destroyer and landed at Lerwick, Shetland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kilde: Starke, Lloyd’s, Steinar Norheim, Arne Sognnes, Norsk Skib I Verdenskrigen, NY Times 1894.
Samlet og bearbeidet av Per Sundfær
Sist oppdatert: 22/11-2021 (PS)